Scientists Building Indestructible ‘Black Box’ to Record End Of Humanity

In the quiet, remote expanse of Tasmania, Australia, a project unlike any other is taking shape. Earth’s Black Box, a colossal steel monolith designed to withstand the test of time, is under construction.

Its purpose? To record and preserve a comprehensive account of the planet’s climate change journey, from the present day to a future that is both uncertain and foreboding.

Scientists Building Indestructible 'Black Box' to Record End Of Humanity

The project is a collaboration between the University of Tasmania, marketing communications company Clemenger BBDO, and artistic collective The Glue Society.

The team behind this ambitious endeavor envisions Earth’s Black Box as a silent observer, constantly absorbing data and information about the world’s climate crisis. It will document everything from land and sea temperatures to ocean acidification, CO2 levels, and the extinction of wildlife.

“The purpose of the device is to provide an unbiased account of the events that lead to the demise of the planet, hold accountability for future generations, and inspire urgent action,”

Project’s website (https://www.earthsblackbox.com/)

The structure itself is an imposing sight. At the size of a city bus and encased in three-inch-thick steel, it is designed to withstand the very catastrophes it is meant to record. Solar panels will power the storage drives that will hold the vast amount of data collected.

The developers estimate that the black box has the capacity to store data for the next three to five decades. “It sends a very strong message that the real black box here is in the minds of the politicians who had all the levers required to avert the catastrophe but decided to keep passing the buck until it was too late,” said Vladislav Kaim, a Moldovian member of the UN Secretary-General’s Youth Advisory Group on Climate Change, in an interview with CNN.

The project has already begun to collect data, starting from the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow, Scotland, in November. It is a stark reminder of the urgency of the climate crisis and the need for immediate action.

“We are exploring the possibility of including an electronic reader that stays within the box and will be activated upon exposure to sunlight, also reactivating the box if it has entered a long-term dormant state as a result of catastrophe,” said Jim Curtis, executive creative director at Clemenger BBDO.

The younger generations may stand to benefit from the project by using it to find solutions since they are the most threatened by climate change-fueled catastrophes in the future.

Earth’s Black Box is more than just a data storage facility. It is a symbol of hope and a call to action. It is a reminder that the future of our planet is in our hands, and that we must act now to prevent a catastrophe.

As the project continues to take shape, it serves as a stark reminder of the importance of addressing the climate crisis before it’s too late.